May 2016: African American News, Highlights, and Mentions

Chesler found that 70 percent of fathers who fight for custody win, regardless of the father’s character or even if he’s an active part of the child’s life. The perception of mothers who retain custody of their children is flawed. They don’t all have their children because the courts decided that they were the better…

Black History 1: Art, Psychology, Law, and Sports

The African Blood Brotherhood for African Liberation and Redemption (ABB) was a Marxist communist and black nationalist organization that emerged in response to the violent race riots of the Red Summer of 1919. Founded in 1919 in Harlem by Cyril V. Briggs, a West Indian immigrant, the organization was structured as a secret fraternal society…

A Change of Perspective on Women: Malcolm X

One thing that I became aware of in my traveling recently through Africa and the Middle East in every country you go to, usually the degree of progress can never be separated from the woman. If you’re in a country that is progressive, then woman is progressive. If you’re in a country that reflects the…

Julian Frances Abele, African American Architect

Born in 1881, Philadelphia native Julian Frances Abele was the unknown black architect that is finally receiving recognition for his architectural accomplishments in this country.  He graduated from Philadelphia High School and matriculated to UPenn’s School of Architecture. Abele’s graduation in 1902 was historic for, not only was he at the top of his class, but he…

The Sherlock Holmes of Black History: Arturo A. Schomburg

Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, Afro-Latino, the Sherlock Holmes of Black History. (January 24, 1874-June 8, 1938) A bibliophile, collector, writer, and a key intellectual figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Born in Puerto Rico in 1874, to a mother of Danish West Indian origin and a father of German ancestry, Schomburg moved to New York in 1891….